Carvonia

Etymology:

De Bernardo Stempel, along with Scherrer, argues that Carvonia is an attributive form on *-yā from an earlier *Karvona (‘deer Goddess’) from IE *k̂ṛwo- (‘cervus’) affixed with the female theonymic suffix -onā.[1][2]

Function:

According to Šašel Kos, Carvonia is “a deity of nature, forests, and hunting.”[3] She also elaborates that this resemblance to Artemis/Diana is important, as worship of Artemis is attested among the Southeastern Alpine celts by Greco-Roman sources, who detail the Celtic practice of sacrificing annually to Artemis.[4] This may be reinforced by a possible Norican myth attested in the Suda Encyclopedia and its similarity to the myth of the Calydonian Boar.[5][6]

In Practice:

In Bessus Noricon, Carvonia is a goddess of nature, the forest, and the hunt, likely also with connotations of fertility and abundance.

Interpretatio:

Although unattested epigraphically, Carvonia would likely be interpreted as Artemis or Diana.

Iconography:

According to Her name, as well as her connection to the Cult Cart of Strettweg[7], she is strongly asociated with deer.

Sources

  1. Die in Noricum Belegten Gottheiten by Patrizia de Bernardo Stempel, 2005, p. 18

  2. Die sprachliche Analyse keltischer Theonyme by Patrizia de Bernardo Stempel, 2003, p. 44

  3. Pre-Roman Divinities of the Eastern Alps and Adriatic by Marjeta Šašel Kos, 1999, p. 137

  4. Pre-Roman Divinities of the Eastern Alps and Adriatic by Marjeta Šašel Kos, 1999, p. 138

  5. Suda Encyclopedia, beta.265

  6. “Calydonian Boar” in Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 2019, by Wikipedia contributors

  7. Pre-Roman Divinities of the Eastern Alps and Adriatic by Marjeta Šašel Kos, 1999, p. 138