Sedatos

Etymology:

De Bernardo Stempel gives the form *sed-atos, from the root *sedos meaning peace, i.e. ‘The Peaceful One’.[1]

Function:

Perhaps in running with His name, Sedatos seems to have been a patron of craftwork.[2] Although His worship is attested in Noricum (in Celeia), much more can be gleaned from evidence of His cult in Pannonia. According to de Bernardo Stempel and Scherrer, He was worshipped there by communities of blacksmiths and fire-workers.[3][4] For Šašel Kos, however, his association is with mining.[5]

In Practice:

In Bessus Noricon, Sedatos, will be a God of craft and metalwork of all kinds, with a special association with fire, such as that of the forge.

Interpretatio:

Sedatos is often conflated with Volcanus, who was worshipped in a similar area.[6]

Iconography:

Although not much is known about symbolic aspects of the cult of Sedatos, it is not unreasonable to assume that He would have been represented by symbols of the forge or of craftwork, such as the apron, the hammer, and the anvil.

Sources

  1. Die in Noricum Belegten Gottheiten by Patrizia de Bernardo Stempel, 2005, p. 22

  2. Die in Noricum Belegten Gottheiten by Patrizia de Bernardo Stempel, 2005, p. 22

  3. Die in Noricum Belegten Gottheiten by Patrizia de Bernardo Stempel, 2005, p. 22

  4. Der Kult der namentlich bezeugten Gottheiten im römerzeitlichen Noricum by Peter Scherrer, 1984, pp. 105 & 587

  5. Pre-Roman Divinities of the Eastern Alps and Adriatic by Marjeta Šašel Kos, 1999, p. 132

  6. Pre-Roman Divinities of the Eastern Alps and Adriatic by Marjeta Šašel Kos, 1999, p. 133 & 146